Carbon Fibre: The things you need to know

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Well all know Carbon fibre is awesome, It’s as strong as a silver back gorilla and as light as a helium filled balloon. Its mesmerising texture mimics the well know chessboard or finish flag, It can be used to make just about anything and at times can be a right pain to work with.

All my friends have carbon fibre something or an other, one has a pen, a few have bits on their cars and even my too cool for school uncle Karl has a carbon fibre wine bottle holder. We think its fair to say that carbon fibre is finally getting the recognition it deserves as a super material as it gains popularity.

After all, there is no better way to make cars, jets, boats and bridges stronger and lighter, which is probably the reason the likes of automotive royalty Lamborghini are sinking millions into carbon fibre research for their luxury super cars.

So with the inevitability of carbon fibre becoming the next big talking point at your local sailing club, race tract, gym or pub, we thought it would only be right to let you in on some neat facts about carbon fibre you might not know.

You won’t see carbon fibre everywhere, because it’s costly

There’s one good reason you won’t see more carbon fibre around today and thats because it’s pricey as hell. Mostly, because of the cost of the raw ingredients and expensive labour rates due to highly skilled workers pouring many hours over each carbon part made.

Carbon fibre typically starts life as a precursor, made from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) or rayon or petroleum pitch. On a molecular level, these materials are characterized by lengthy strands of molecules bound by carbon atoms. The exact composition of the raw ingredients varies widely, and are most often carefully guarded as trade secrets.

The raw materials are exposed to various chemicals, reacted with catalysts, spun into textile-like fibres, heat treated to re-arrange their molecular structure, re-treated in a chamber with a specific temperature, pressure and gas composition, and eventually woven into a fabric sheet, which is cut, formed, molded, glued, lacquered and sanded. Sounds like Childs play right.

Is carbon fibre really that strong and light?

Hell yes! It has been reported to be a whopping 10x stronger and 5x lighter than the age old steel. According to industry professionals just some benefits of carbon fibre include its unique and nearly impossible-to-duplicate appearance, excellent strength-to-weight ratio, compatibility with other materials such as wood, plastic, concrete, aluminum and steel.

Carbon fibre makes for some bad ass wheels, too!

Some cars, like the new Ford Shelby GT350 R mustang, offer wheels made entirely of carbon fibre. BUT WHY, I hear you ask? well a set of carbon fibre wheels reduces un-sprung weight, and improves handling & responsiveness, steering feel, turn-in, and acceleration of corse.

Could carbon fibre replace other materials?

To making an entire car from carbon fibre would be extremely expensive and very labour intensive, however more and more car manufacturers are capitalising from the benefits of this super-material in less-expensive ways. Today, cars are rolling out with carbon-fibre fenders or bonnets in order to reduce weight in specific areas.

BMW use a process called wet molding and wet pressing, this allows carbon fibre components to be created at a much lower cost, and easily joined with other materials.

THE ALL NEW APOLLO INTENSA EMOZIONO – COULD IT JUST BE…

Ferrari who? A Lamborghini what!

 

That’s right Ladies and Gentlemen, every teenage boy the world over will now be replacing their current wall collection of dream hyper cars consisting of bright red ferries and yellow Lamborghini’s for this utterly savage carbon fibre dressed animal.

Limited to ten bespoke cars and  priced at a tangy £2m a  go, the all new Apollo IE is a track purpose, road-illegal hypercar that’s here to catapult Apollo into the boutique exotic car scene for wealthy billionaires.

Thanks to the Apollos extensive use of our favourite material, CARBON FIBRE the IE boasts a very impressive 1250Kg curb weigh with an additional 1350Kg of down force at 186 MP

H simple to prevent the IE from flying. Its motive energy comes deep from within the middle of the car and is delivered by a 6.3 liter V12 with a 6 speed gearbox knocking out a punchy 769 BHP and Unlike most most modern day

hypercars the IE dose not benefit from any electro hybrid boost.

Despite its lack of Duracell boost the IE is more than capable of delivering 560 fb lb of torque at its 9,000rpm redline thus securing a mediocre            0-62mph in 2.7 seconds, and a top speed of 208mph. Healthy, but not punch you in the face, steal your breath and kick you in the balls outrageous our twisted times you would expected for its banshee appearance.

Pre Launch Glimpse – Apollo Intensa Emozione

Apollo Intensa Emozione Teaser

With two days to go until the full reveal of the new Apollo Intensa Emozione we spotted this little teaser video popped up on the official Apollo  company’s Facebook page along with this photo that can only be descried as the best looking carbon fibre chaise we have ever seen.

Stand by for the full launch of the Apollo Intensa Emozione on the 24/10

 

 

Carbon fibre dress inspired by BMW i8

A well known german car manufacturer infamous for making the infamies M3 and Iconic James Bond style Z8, now a dress to add to their collection?
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Thats right German car maker BMW has hired not one but two top designers to fashion up a stunning carbon fibre dress useing the same materials used in it’s hybrid supercar the I8.
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The masterpiece of automotive engineering and fashion was made by German twins Daniela and Annette Felder, of the London based design duo Felder Felder.

The metallic grey skater dress took well over 100 hours to make and is 97% carbon fibre.

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The fully sustainable material, not yet available to the fashion industry in large quantities, was created at the same place that produces the carbon fibre for BMW’s ground-breaking electric Hybrid BMW i cars.

WHAT – A carbon fibre gear in a helicopter

WHAT – A carbon fibre gear in a helicopter

Could a carbon fibre gear be the future of aerospace and cycling?
On the left, a bog standard metal gear but on the right is the newest and lightest composite carbon fibre gear from a helicopters main rotor gear box. Designed to reduce weight and increase strength this carbon fibre gear is the first of its kind in a bid to take modern aviation to new heights. (pardon the pun)